The Historical Society of the Bible Fellowship Church

August, 2003


            Greetings to all of you who love and enjoy the heritage and history of the Bible Fellowship Church. My enthusiasm and joy at the people I meet and events I experience continue to grow. There is a serious side to the preservation of our history. We learn from our past. It is a mistake to be bound to our past but it is just as great a mistake to ignore our past. I would hope the interest in our history will continue to grow and be valued by a coming generation. The work of our society is to recover and preserve the story of who we are. Our meetings in the fall with their preservation has shown to be a valuable agent in collecting and preserving the research of the authors. This publication is a further opportunity for us to gather stories and information that might not be readily available. For those of us who enjoy our memories, these reminders may only produce a few moments of pleasant nostalgia while they do the valuable work of preserving the story. Welcome to this current edition. May you enjoy.


            I will start with a reminder. Our next meeting is scheduled Saturday, October 25, 2003, at Calvary Bible Fellowship Church in Philadelphia. Pastor Wayne Clapier will present a survey of our urban history and will focus on the history of our church in Wissinoming. In the afternoon, Pastor Robert Smock will present a survey and discussion of churches that did not survive.


            I suppose I am being a bit cautious when I say that some of you might choose not to attend because of “city fear.” I do hope that no one will turn down the opportunity to enjoy the hospitality of the Philadelphia folks because you are afraid of the neighborhoods. I travel to Wissinoming quite often and find it an easy trip. So, you can do it if you wish. We will furnish complete directions. If you have a problem making the trip, we will be offering transportation and car pooling. Jill Davidson will arrange transportation for anyone from the Lehigh Valley. For those who might be willing to drive to Wallingford, we will be glad to provide transportation from that location. Details will follow. Put the date on your calendar and plan to be there.


            Let’s get to it. I will begin this issue with my recent week at Pinebrook. I, like many others of our church, spend an enjoyable week enjoying the hospitality of the staff. Certainly, I share with many others the problem that my belt has to be loosened after all the good food. Meals spent with good food and good company are a great part of the delight of a week at Pinebrook. So, when I noticed that I had a list of a couple of menus at Mizpah Grove, I realized that for many, just the mention of the food would bring back some pleasant moments. In advance, I will ask you to share the memories that rise up as you taste again the joy of those meals. Some of you with cholesterol problems may begin to realize why. It must have been great.





1951 Menu - Mizpah Grove


June

Day of Week

Meat for Dinner

Estimated Customers

Meat for Supper

Estimated Customers

25

Monday

Frankfurters and Rolls

15

Spaghetti and Meat Balls

18

26

Tuesday

Ham and String Beans

93

Hamburger Stew

112

27

Wednesday

Pork and Sauer Kraut

93

 

101

28

Thursday

Meat Loaf

96

 

121

29

Friday

Fish

100

 

117

30

Saturday

Sausage

165

 

178

July

 

 

 

 

 

1

Sunday

Beef and Pork Rst

358

 

329

2

Monday

Meat Pie

278

 

202

3

Tuesday

Liver and Onions

265

 

212

4

Wednesday

Meat Loaf and Pork Rst

406

 

328

5

Thursday

Ham and String Beans

282

 

190

6

Friday

Fish

278

 

211

7

Saturday

Pork Chops

194

 

243

8

Sunday

Chicken and Rst Beef

370

 

426

9

Monday

Beef Stew

125

 

89

10

Tuesday

Sausage

98

 

92

11

Wednesday

Meat Pie

100

 

121

12

Thursday

Pork and Sauer Kraut

109

 

106

13

Friday

Fish

125

 

101

14

Saturday

Spaghetti and Meat Balls

160

 

165

15

Sunday

Chicken and Port Rst

330

 

303

16

Monday

Meat Pie

191

 

145

17

Tuesday

Liver and Onions

222

 

192

18

Wednesday

Pork Chops

294

 

141

19

Thursday

Beef Stew and Pot Pie

259

 

220

20

Friday

Fish

254

 

213

21

Saturday

Veal Cutlets

310

 

249

22

Sunday

Chicken and Rst Beef

446

 

437

23

Monday

Meat Pie

124

 

104

24

Tuesday

Pork Chops

119

 

101

25

Wednesday

Sausage

107

 

103

26

Thursday

Beef Stew

97

 

118

27

Friday

Fish

133

 

120

28

Saturday

Liver and Onions

186

 

192

29

Sunday

Chicken-Beef-Pork Rst

392

 

450

30

Monday

Veal Cutlets

218

 

185

August

 

 

 

 

 

1

Tuesday

Meat Pie

240

 

184

2

Wednesday

Liver ‘ Onions

359

 

334

3

Thursday

Ham and String Beans

268

 

212

4

Friday

Fish

270

 

234

5

Saturday

Pork Chops

318

 

262

6

Sunday

Chicken and Pork Rst

438

 

471

7

Monday

Meat Pie

124

 

118

8

Tuesday

 

75

 

80

9

Wednesday

 

42

 

 


1952 Menu - Mizpah Grove


Date

Day of month

Estimated Customers

Breakfast

Meat for Dinner

Estimated Customers

Meat for Supper

Estimated Customers

23

Mon

 

Frankfurters, Rolls, B. Beans

28

Spaghetti with meat

25

24

Tues

20

Ham and String Beans

100

Hamburger Stew

126

25

Wed

50

Pork and Sauer Kraut

94

Hamburger Stew B. B. Spaghetti

94

26

Thurs

74

Meat Loaf

112

Frizzled Beef and Toast

129

27

Fri

85

Fish

117

Cold Meat, bean soup, B. B.

137

28

Sat

103

Pork Sausage

215

Veg. Soup, Mc&Cheese, S. Salad

200

29

Sun

144

Beef and Chicken

383

Hot Beef & Chicken Soup

363

30

Mon

130

Meat Pie

271

Meat Pie and Pea Soup

180

1

Tues

136

Liver and Onions

267

Liver and Onions

194

2

Wed

140

Plain Pork Chops

298

 

204

3

Thurs

147

Fish

318

 

265

4

Fri

167

Meat Loaf and Ham

426

 

358

5

Sat

160

Sausage

332

 

255

6

Sun

179

Pork and Chicken

443

 

457

7

Mon

116

Meat Pie

144

Hot Rst Pk Sandwiches

107

8

Tues

74

Sausage and Ham

120

 

105

9

Wed

79

Hamburger Stew

138

 

127

10

Thurs

82

Veal Casserole

121

 

107

11

Fri

91

Fish

140

 

134

12

Sat

109

Pork Chops

207

 

203

13

Sun

153

Meat Loaf and Turkey

371

 

392

14

Mon

129

Meat Pie

174

 

174

15

Tues

131

Liver and Onions

208

 

182

16

Wed

153

Breaded Pork Chops

266

 

285

17

Thurs

156

Spaghetti and Meat Balls

253

 

242

18

Fri

143

Fish

266

 

196

19

Sat

156

Beef Steak

274

 

266

20

Sun

174

Beef and Chicken

391

 

438

21

Mon

114

Corn or Meat Pie

151

 

133

22

Tues

84

Pk Chops and Sauer Kraut

125

 

118

23

Wed

90

Hamburger Stew

119

 

143

24

Thurs

94

Fresh Sausage

148

 

141

25

Fri

89

Fish

142

 

146

26

Sat

100

Veal Casserole

215

 

220

27

Sun

156

Pork and Chicken

337

 

391

28

Mon

145

Meat or Corn Pie

268

 

190

29

Tues

129

Breaded Pk Chops

271

 

221

30

Wed

154

Spaghetti and Meat Balls

279

 

221

31

Thurs

144

Fresh Sausage

251

 

243

1

Fri

146

Fish

301

 

235

2

Sat

156

Beef Stew

330

 

285

3

Sun

169

Beef Rst and Chicken

449

 

529




 

            My second presentation is one of the unpublished histories of one of our churches. Recently, we have been blessed by those who were willing to research the story of their church and tell it to us. I always enjoy the story when told by someone who lived it.


            The following is some memories of the Spring City Church from Cora Fox. I recollect having met Mrs. Fox on one occasion when she had come to visit Spring City from her home in Florida. Her story lingers with me. She became a widow at an early age when her husband, a railroad worker, was tragically killed on the job when he was run over by a train. When I spoke with her, she had been a widow for 70 years. She had served in the Spring City Church as the Sunday School Superintendent and I am sure in other vital roles. Following the death of her husband, the railroad had hired her. She spent the rest of her career serving and, as many told me, she rose in the organization to have many important responsibilities. When I met her, I was impressed that she was an impressive person. She was articulate, thoughtful, confident and stimulating. Looking back after these years, she is one of those persons I wish I had known better. Her recollections were apparently written down about 1937. Those who have ever seen the little church on Yost Avenue will enjoy her memories.





A Resume’

By Cora Fox


            We are indeed fortunate in that our lot has fallen at a place where the full gospel is preached - and has been preached since the organization of these branches of God’s work. By a full gospel I mean such truths as Divine Healing and the Second Coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. Today these truths are heard from many quarters as they are advanced and discussed by various denominations, but this has not always been so. In my opinion, Christian Science and Russellism would not have flourished as they have, if these truths had been taught in all Christendom.


            Forty five years ago the plans for a small chapel on Yost Avenue, Spring City, Pennsylvania, were given out by the Mennonite Brethren in Christ Church. A church of this denomination had been organized a few years before in Royersford, at which place a small membership had been built up. There were at this time, possibly only a half-dozen members or adherents on the Spring City side of the river.


            My early recollections of this chapel are of an interior smaller than that at present. An anteroom and vestible have since been added. The door, which was in the middle of the front of the church, opened directly into the little auditorium. Later a small box-like vestibule was built at the door.

            The aisle lay through the center of the chapel and was covered by a hemp material, while red ingrain carpet covered the space around the altar and pulpit. The seats were of plain wood, built after a straight, stiff fashion, and every alternating one was equipped with hinges which allowed the back to be turned, for use in Sunday School work. The windows were of plain glass panes, painted white. The lights consisted of two large and two small oil lamps with reflectors. A large round-bodied stove stood in the center to the right of the aisle. The Sunday School book used was about 7" by 9", with the dimensions reversed from those used today, entitled “Songs of the Morning”. The book used for a time in the church services was a small limp covered book with notes, containing “Ebenezer” hymns. These hymns were supplemented by inspiring choruses as “We’ll Roll the Old Chariot Along”, “Old Time Religion” and similar ones.


            And so, although this was an humble little edifice, the people came, the church was filled on those revival nights, sometimes crowded. And since the following itself was small, the majority of these people were members of other churches, or non-church goers who came to hear this new, perhaps to them, unique gospel. And many were saved and baptized during the first winter of the life of the little chapel.

 

            One cannot help but think of the many hundreds who have passed through the door of this building during these 45 years. Some were casual visitors, others came for a time and then were seen no more, others have moved away, others have passed on, and some are still with us. We cannot even thin of the mighty influence for good which has gone out from the little chapel. Although humble in structure, and in worship and in doctrine, yet was found among this group of people, a cheer and warmth and Godly atmosphere which attracted indefinably, and as the Word has been sounded forth - and in tourn the hearers have gone forth, there has emanated a blessed influence that eternity alone will fully reveal.


            Surely, our church has filled a unique and divinely beneficial place in the life of our community.

                         [Cora R. Fox - 1937]





            The Bible Fellowship Church has known few of the kinds of divisive events that tragically come to churches. Most of us know a story of a church somewhere which has had to endure the horrors of conflict that splits a church. In three installments, you will experience the story of the conflict which came to the Quakertown Church. What you will read are the accounts of the arguments presented to support the case of each of the parties. The first installment is the arguments of those who sought to regain the use of the church building. The second installment is the response of the defendants. The third is the court’s decision. As the installments unfold, you can work through the arguments and decide who you think had the upper hand. As you read, you will hear many of the details of our history. Notice, that those who spoke of the background of our church dated the beginning to 1853 when the prayer meeting controversy began. Be patient with the legal language - an interesting story is there.




IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS

OF BUCKS COUNTY-SITTING IN EQUITY.


W. S. Hottel, Arthur Sterner, Titus G. Taylor, Samuel Weiss, Sr., Lewis L. Weiss, Wm. Walter Behringer, C. M. Kropp, Maria Taylor, Priscilla Sterner, Rebecca Weiss, Annie Weiss, Lizzie Sterner, Charles S. Long, Mary M. Long, Cora Kropp, in behalf of themselves and in behalf of such other persons as may become parties to this bill, Plaintiffs,

                         vs.

M. A. Zyner, Henry Smith, Frank Schuler, Stephen Trumbauer, Elizabeth Hixson, Amanda Schuler, Mary Rau, Elizabeth Smith, Mary L. Sanders, Annie McElroy, Maria Funk, Jas. Hartranft, Kate Hartranft, Wm. Hartranft.


To the Honorable, the President Judge of said Court:

     Your orators complain and say,--

          1. That the said plaintiffs being members of the Evangelical Mennonite Church, of Quakertown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, now, in their own behalf, as well as on behalf of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, of the Borough of Quakertown, in the County of Bucks, and State of Pennsylvania, and those members of the congregation and association, who, with said plaintiffs adhere to and maintain the system of religious principles, usages, customs and laws declared and exhibited by the body formerly known as the Evangelical Mennonite Church, who were afterwards known as the Evangelical United Mennonites, and still later and at present known as the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, and are in subordination to the authority, and acknowledge the jurisdiction of the General Conference of the said church, and for the benefit of all other members of the said association, who, with them, adhere to the laws, usages and customs thereof, and may desire to become plaintiffs herein, all of whom, with the plaintiffs, will suffer irreparable injury unless the defendants, and those acting with them, be restrained from the commission of the unlawful acts hereinafter complained of, bring this, their Bill of Complaint against the said defendants, and allege and charge as follows:–

          2. That there exists, and for upwards of fifty years has existed, in the United States of America and Canada, an unincorporated religious association of Christians known originally as the Evangelical Mennonites, which was organized in 1853; that upon Nov. 8, 1879, the name of the body was changed to the Evangelical United Mennonites, and on Dec. 27, 1883, the name was changed to the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, and has since been known by that name; that said association is organized and governed by a fundamental law both found in unwritten well established usages, and in written law known as the Discipline, which provides among other things for the ministry and membership of said association upon the plan of what is known as the Episcopal form of church government, that is, in which one order of the clergy is superior to another; that under this association or conventional form of church government provided for and formulated in said discipline and uniform custom, the said association has a system of graded ecclesiastical, executive, legislative and judicial bodies and officers for the administration of its church laws and internal affairs, and under and by which rules and system of government each local society or congregation or class of said denomination is a subordinate member of the general organization, and all such bodies, officers and societies, as well as all the individual members of the denomination, are subject to the provisions of the said Discipline and unwritten rules or customs. A copy of the said book of Discipline is filed herewith as a part of this bill of complaint, and is marked exhibit "A."

          3. That under the Discipline and customs of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, the itinerant preachers of said denomination throughout that part of the world wherein the denomination is found, and those preachers whereof who have traveled, and stand in full connection by ordination with the ministry of the said denomination, together with lay delegates appointed by the individual churches or classes, are organized into a number of different bodies called Annual Conferences, each of which convenes once every year, and each of which, for certain purposes of church government and administration, exercise jurisdiction over and throughout a certain territory, and is erected, established and maintained or abolished, and has its territorial limits fixed and declared at the will and authority of the General Conference of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, which latter body, as hereinafter set forth, is the supreme legislative and judicial authority in church affairs of said denomination, and under the laws of said association it is the duty of all itinerant preachers thereof, who hold charges or pastorates within the bounds of any annual conference to attend the meetings of said annual conference every year.

          4. The Annual Conference of the said association are five in number, and are named respectively as follows: Pennsylvania Conference, Canada, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Nebraska, and all of the said Annual Conferences are subject to the rules and laws of said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, as set forth and printed in its book of Discipline, already referred to, and the usages and customs of said body.

          5. That under said fundamental law or discipline of said association, there is a Quadrennial Conference of the whole association composed of Presiding Elders, Editors, Agent of Book Room, and delegates, one from every 300 members, and an additional one in case the fraction of members is 200 or more, elected by ballot at the last annual conference of general conference term. Every alternate delegate is a lay member. This Quadrennial Conference is known as the General Conference, and is constituted by the fundamental law or discipline aforesaid, and by the customs of the said organization, the Supreme Court of law in the church, with power to decide upon the legality of all acts of Annual Conferences, and all cases arising between the Annual Conference and such as may arise between any incorporated society of the church and its officers, of any annual conference, and with power, moreover, to make rules and regulations for the church, and to inspect and examine the records of all accounts and transactions of the Annual Conferences, which records it is made the duty of the Annual Conference to submit to the General Conference, and the said General Conference has power to make such rules and regulations as will enable it to execute the powers conferred upon it.

          6. That your orators show that the ministers of said association are divided into three orders, Presiding Elders, Elders and Probationers. The persons belonging to said orders respectively must possess certain qualifications and have certain duties and functions to perform according to the book of Discipline. It is the duty of the Presiding Elder, with the aid of the Stationing Committee to appoint the preachers of said Annual Conference for the next ensuing year to their respective stations, circuits, or fields of labor; and an appointment so made by the Presiding Elder and Stationing Committee confers full power upon the preacher so appointed and constitutes his sole and only authority under the discipline and usages of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, to perform the duties and enjoy the privileges and emoluments belonging to the office of pastor or preacher of the local society, class or congregation to which he may be so appointed, such method of appointment being the lawful and usual method of ministerial appointment at the Annual Conference of the said Mennonite brethren in Christ.

          7. The body now known as the Mennonite Brethren in Christ was started in 1853 under the leadership of Rev. William Gehman, who, with others, formerly belonged to what is called the Oberholtzer Mennonites, popularly called Mennonites No. 2. The occasion for the division was that the new party favored holding prayer meetings, and the old party from whom they divided, did not. On the 24th of September, 1858, this body held its first conference in Upper Milford, Lehigh County. Upon Nov. 8, 1879, the Evangelical Mennonites united with the body in Canada of the same belief and practices, called the United Mennonites. The new body was named the Evangelical United Mennonites. On December 27, 1883, the Evangelical United Mennonites united with the Brethren in Christ, a body of the same faith and same practices located in the State of Ohio, and the name was changed to the Mennonite Brethren in Christ. The body has retained this name ever since. This has been one body from 1883 down to the present time. The changes or combinations that took place were unanimous. They were not occasioned in any case by divisions or differences, but by union of those of the same beliefs and the same practices.

          8. The work at Quakertown, which afterwards resulted in the organization of the church now at Quakertown, was started about the year 1868, by Rev. Jonas Musselman, under the direction of the church organization then known as the Evangelical Mennonites but now called Mennonite Brethren in Christ. Rev. Jonas Musselman started preaching in the house of Jacob Horn and later in a hall. He reported the work to the conference, and they appointed a committee to move a church building located at Flatland, in Haycock Township, a country place 7 or 8 [pencil notes show 3 or 4] miles from Quakertown. They authorized Rev. Jonas Musselman to visit the different churches and collect money to pay for rebuilding of the edifice. The money was mostly furnished by members of the denomination outside of Quakertown. There were but few members at Quakertown, and all very poor. Besides the material that was furnished, there was about $2300.00 expended in completing the building. This church was regularly dedicated under and by the proper authority of the said Evangelical Mennonites according to the doctrine, discipline, laws, customs, usages and practices of the said body. In 1869, Rev. Jonas Musselman received an appointment from the Evangelical Mennonites to preach at Iron Hill. During this time he continued the mission at Quakertown. He was stationed at Quakertown until 1879. In February, 1879, the Conference appointed Rev. Jonas Musselman to Quakertown, and added Hatfield to his charge. In 1882 the same body now called the Evangelical United Mennonites stationed Rev. A. Strawn to take charge of Quakertown and Hatfield, and Rev. Jonas Musselman was stationed at Upper Milford and Fleetwood. Rev. A. Strawn remained at Quakertown until 1884, when Rev. Abraham Kauffman was stationed at Quakertown and Hatfield, who remained in this charge until 1886. Then Rev. A. Strawn was again stationed at Quakertown and Hatfield, where he remained until 1887. The conference then stationed Rev. Geo. A. Campbell at Quakertown and Hatfield, who remained in these fields until 1890. Rev. J. E. Fiddler was then stationed at Quakertown and Hatfield. In I89I Rev. A. B. Gehret was stationed at these fields, and for personal reasons at his request, the Presiding Elder, under the Discipline, placed Owen Bitting, who remained upon the field until 1892. At this time Rev. Milton A. Zyner was stationed by the Conference at Quakertown and Hatfield, where he remained until 1895. The said body is within the territorial limits of the Pennsylvania Conference, Mennonite Brethren in Christ, and during all of these years the class or church at Quakertown was subject to the discipline, laws, rules, usages, customs, doctrines and practices of the body first known as the United Evangelical Mennonites, and afterwards known as the Mennonite Brethren in Christ. They made their reports every year to said body, and acknowledged the authority of the same. They received without objection the pastors appointed to their field by the Annual Conferences. They contributed to the support of the missionary bodies belonging to the said general body, and Rev. Milton A. Zyner was received as a candidate for the ministry in the year 1888, by the Annual Conference of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ. He was ordained as a regular pastor in the year 1891. He was Secretary of the Annual Conferences of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ during the years 1885 – 1886 – 1890, and while was pastor of the said church, including the year 1895, he made the reports required by the discipline to the Annual Conferences of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ. In 1892 he prepared the Steward’s account book, which appears in his own hand-writing and is labeled “1892, Quakertown Circuit, Mennonite Brethren in Christ, Ministerial Contributions.” It is headed on the first page “1892, Quakertown Circuit, Mennonite Brethren in Christ, Ministerial Contributions, Steward’s Account.” He regularly signed the receipts in this book until and including the meeting of the last Quarterly Conference in the year 1894.

          9. A charter for the Quakertown church was applied for to the Court of Common Pleas at Doylestown, April 8, I872. It was properly advertised September 16, 1872, and the charter was granted Oct. 22, 1872, and recorded in Miscellaneous Book, Vol. 17, Page 290. The name of the body incorporated was the Evangelical Mennonite Church of Quakertown, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania. The Trustees were Jonas Musselman, Henry M. Smith and Jacob Horn.

          That by indenture dated Sept. 17, 1872, recorded at Doylestown, in the County of Bucks, May 7, I8751 in Deed Book Vol. 174, Page 389, K. Himmelwright and Sarah, his wife conveyed unto the Evangelical Mennonite Church, of Quakertown Borough, a certain tract of land situate in the Borough of Quakertown, in the County of Bucks, limited in said deed as follows: All that certain property beginning at the intersection of a 20 feet wide street with Third street, and extending thence along the East side of Third street, North 90 degrees 10 minutes, East 88 feet to corner of Joseph Thomas, thence East by the same at right angles with Third street 180 feet to the West Side of another to feet wide street, thence along same parallel with Third street 71 feet to the intersection of the same with the said first mentioned 20 feet wide street, and along the same parallel with Juniper street North 86 degrees 5 minutes, 180 feet to place of beginning.

          10. In the year 1895, Rev. M. A. Zyner came to Conference which was held at Reading, Pa., with all the reports, as usual, and with the Lay Delegate, J. D. Kindig. There were certain charges against the said M. A. Zyner made by the Presiding Elder. These were referred to a committee. The committee to whom the case had been referred reported as follows: "Whereas, Elder M. A. Zyner was charged before the Annual Conference for disloyalty, untruthfulness and more or less conspiracy, this committee investigated the charges and declares him guilty, therefore, Resolved, that this committee request the Stationing Committee not to give him an appointment for the present. Should he not humble himself, prove true and loyal to the Discipline and the Presiding Elder, severer measures shall be resorted to." A short time afterwards the following paper was handed to the Presiding Elder, signed by the parties following Rev M. A. Zyner:

          "We the undersigned church members of the Quakertown Class on Third street, do hereby withdraw our membership from M. B. in Christ Church and Conference, from the annexed date, February 5, A. D., 1895. Wm. Hixson, E. Hixson, Franklin M. Schuler, Amanda Schuler, Alice Trumbauer, Nettle Shelly, Mary Rau, Elizabeth Smith, Mary L. Sanders, Lydia Stoneback, Franie Mitman, Isaac McElroy, Anna McElroy, hlaria Funk, Tames A. Hartranft, Kate Hartranft, Mary E. Sanders, Joseph Wales, W. Hartranft, Martha Hartranft, Alvesta Stein, Fayetta Senior.

          11. That at the said Annual Conference held in 1895, at Reading, the Stationing Committee appointed Rev. Wilson Steinmetz to have charge of the church at Quakertown, Coopersburg and Springown. His appointment as pastor and preacher thereto in the manner aforesaid was regular and valid, and was the only regular and valid assignment and appointment of pastor and preacher of the said churches.

          Your orators further complain that after the meeting of the Conference, the said Wilson Steinmetz offered and attempted to enter the said church edifice for the purpose of performing his duties and enjoying his rights as pastor and preacher of said society, and demanded from the defendants herein, and those associated with and adhering to them the possession and occupancy of the pulpit of said church for the purpose aforesaid, and William B. Musselman, who was then Presiding Elder of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, demanded of and from the said individual defendants, and those associated with them, who were in possession of the said pulpit, permission for Wilson Steinmetz to enter the said church and occupy the pulpit thereof, according to the doctrines, usages and customs of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ, but the said defendants, havings conspired and combined to prevent the Rev. Wilson Steinlmetz from entering the pulpit of said church and perform his duties as pastor and preacher therein, refused to permit him to enter or occupy said church andpulpit as preacher and pastor of the said society, or otherwise to officiate in and about the premises as pastor and preacher aforesaid, and by force and violence wholly prevented him from doing so. They have hitherto wholly prevented him from entering said church and pulpit and from performing the duties and enjoying the rights and privileges as pastor and preacher, but on the contrary the defendants have unlawfully suffered and permitted, and now unlawfully suffer and permit said Milton A. Zyner to use and occupy the said church and its pulpit ostensibly as pastor and preacher of said society, and thus the said trustees, Henry Smith, Franklin M. Schuler and Stephen Trumbauer, claiming to be and acting as trustees of the said Quakertown church have thus violated their trust in diverting said church property from the legitimate uses for which the same was originally conveyed, and to which it was solemnly dedicated, and have refused and neglected to perform their duties and obligations as trustees of the said Evangelical Mennonite Church of Quakertown, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania.

 The Annual Conference in the year 1896, stationed Rev. Geo. A. Campbell to the churches at Quakertcrwn and Hatfield. He served until 1898 when Rev. W. K. Ziegler was stationed at churches at Quakertown, Hatfield and Norristown, who served until 1900, when the said Annual Conference stationed Rev. T. C. Roth at Quakertown and Hatfield. He served until 1903, when Rev. W. S. Hottel was appointed by the said Conference to serve the churches at Quakertown and Hatfield, who still is serving in said charges. That because the defendants persisted in refusing the plaintiffs to use their church property upon Third street, in the Borough of Quakertown, the said plaintiffs were compelled to build a small chapel which they have been temporarily using until they might again gain possession of their own property, hoping that the defendants might come to their sense of duty and surrender the property which they have been wrongfully withholding and still continue to withhold.

          That the said defendants refuse the use of the said house and pulpit for all of the pastors that have been stationed during these years by the Annual Conference of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ, viz, Rev. Geo. A. Campbell, Rev. W. K. Ziegler, Rev J. C. Roth, and at the present time Rev. W. S. Hottel, and since 1903 the Rev. W. S. Hottel, the plaintiff, on his own behalf, and in behalf of the other plaintiffs and members of the said society and association who adhere to him as the rightful pastor and preacher of said society, has again demanded of the said individual defendants that they permit him, the said Wm. S. Hottel, as pastor and preacher of the said church to enter the pulpit of the said church and hold divine service therein under and according to the discipline, usages and customs of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ; but said individual defendants, and more especially the said trustees, have hitherto refused, and do still refuse, to permit said Wm. S. Hottel so to do, have hitherto prevented, and do still prevent him from entering the church and Dulpit as pastor and preacher thereof for the purposes aforesaid.

          12. Your orators further show that under the laws and usages of the said Mennonite Brethren in Christ the lawful pastor of every charge or congregation thereof is entitled to receive and collect therefrom, and from the members thereof, by virtue of his office as pastor and preacher, a certain sum as salary or compensation. By the rules of the Discipline and usages of said church, it has been the custom for a man called the steward to make these collections; but the said individual defendants have not paid, and refuse to pay over or contribute any portion of the sum thus collected to the said W. S. Hottel, and they deny his right thereto and every portion thereof, and declare that they will not contribute anything toward making up said sum for W. S. Hottel. And your orators show that the said individual defendants are contributing, and have heretofore contributed and paid over various sums of money to said M. A. Zyner as and for compensation to him as pretended pastor and preacher of said society, and threaten they will continue to contribute and pay said sum of money to Rev. M. A. Zyner for and during the remainder of the current year, and that they will refuse to contribute or pay the same to your orator, W. S. Hottel.

          13. Your orators therefore pray for the following relief:

          1. That the said defendant, M. A. Zyner, be enjoined and restrained by right or perpetual injunction from exercising or attempting to exercise the functions of pastor and preacher of the said Evangelical Mennonite Church at Quakertown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, and from entering and occupying the church edifice and its pulpit of said society as its pastor and preacher.

          2. That the said defendants, Henry Smith, Franklin Schuler and Stephen Trumbauer, trustees of the said Evangelical Mennonite Church of Quakertown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, be enjoined and restrained from permitting the said M. A. Zyner to exercise or attempt to exercise the functions of pastor or preacher of the said church, and from permitting him to enter and occupy the church edifice and its pulpit of said society as the pastor or preacher thereof.

          3. That the said defendants, the trustees above named and the said M. A. Zyner be enjoined and restrained from preventing the said Wm. S. Hottel from exercising the duties and functions of pastor and preacher of the said Evangelical Mennonite Church of Quakertown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania which belongs to the body now known as the Mennonite Brethren in Christ; and from preventing him from entering and occupying the churchedifice and its pulpit of said society as pastor and preacher thereof.

          4. That the said defendant, M. A. Zyner be enjoined and restrained from collecting or receiving any money from the members of the said society of the Evangelical Mennonite Church of Quakertown, Bucks Co., Pennsylvania, either for himself as pretended preacher, or for any other church purpose.

          5. That the said defendants and those adhering to them may be commanded hereafter from time to time to admit to the said pulpit and the exercise and performance of pastoral rights and duties respectively, whomsoever the Presiding Elder elected by the said Annual Conference of the Mennonite Brethren in Christ having charge of the Pennsylvania Conference aforesaid shall, with the assistance of the Stationing Committee, and in accordance with the fundamental law and discipline aforesaid assign to the said church.

  6. Such other and further relief as to equity and justice belong.


W. S. HOTTEL

TITUS G. TAYLOR

LEWIS L. WEISS

C. M. KROPP

PRISCILLA STERNER

ANNIE WEISS

CHARLES S. LONG

CORA KROPP

ARTHUR STERNER

SAMUEL WEISS, SR.

WM. WALTER BEHRINGER

MARIA TAYLOR

REBECCA WEISS

LIZZIE STERNER

MARY M. LONG


Bucks COUNTY, SS.:

    W. S. Hottel and Titus G. Taylor, two of the plaintiffs above named, being duly affirmed according to law, both in their own behalf and also in behalf of all the said plaintiffs, say that the statements of fact contained in the foregoing Bill of Complaint so far as stated of their own knowledge are true, and so far as stated upon the information of others they believe them to be true.



Affirmed and subscribed before me this.. day of November, 1904




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